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Jerome Bruner – How does teaching influence learning?

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Jerome S. Bruner, had just turned 99 less than a week before this video was filmed He was born Oct. 1, 1915, New York, N.Y., He is an American psychologist and educator whose work on perception, learning, memory, and other aspects of cognition in young children has, along with the related work of Jean Piaget, influenced the American educational system.Bruner’s father, a watch manufacturer, died when Bruner was 12 years old. Bruner studied at Duke University in Durham, N.C. (B.A., 1937), and then at Harvard University, where he received a doctorate in psychology in 1941. After serving as an expert on psychological warfare for the U.S. Army in France during World War II, Bruner returned to Harvard in 1945, becoming professor of psychology there (1952). From 1960 to 1972 he also directed the university’s Center for Cognitive Studies. He left Harvard to become professor of experimental psychology at the University of Oxford (1972–80). He then became concurrently a professor at the New School for Social Research, New York City, and a fellow at the New York Institute for the Humanities, New York University.

Bruner’s studies helped to introduce Piaget’s concept of developmental stages of cognition into the classroom. His much-translated book The Process of Education (1960) was a powerful stimulus to the curriculum-reform movement of the period. In it he argued that any subject can be taught to any child at any stage of development, if it is presented in the proper manner. According to Bruner, all children have natural curiosity and a desire to become competent at various learning tasks; when a task as presented to them is too difficult, however, they become bored. A teacher must, therefore, present schoolwork at a level so as to challenge the child’s current developmental stage. Bruner also studied perception in children, concluding that children’s individual values significantly affect their perceptions.

Bruner published extensively. Major works include Mandate from the People (1944), A Study of Thinking (1956, with Jacqueline J. Goodnow and George A. Austin), On Knowing: Essays for the Left Hand (1962), Toward a Theory of Instruction (1966), Processes of Cognitive Growth: Infancy (1968), The Relevance of Education (1971), Communication as Language (1982), Child’s Talk (1983), Actual Minds, Possible Worlds (1986), Acts of Meaning (1990), The Culture of Education (1996), Minding the Law (2000), and Making Stories: Law, Literature, Life (2003).

[Video source: The Brainwaves Video Anthology You Tube channel] [Text source: Encyclopedia Britannica]

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